One Proud Parent

There are times, let’s just say, when this parenting thing is hard. Very hard.

Then there are times, let’s just say, when this parenting thing is cool. Very cool.

This post is about one of the cool times. It’s about a five-year-old who did something so cool (at least to me) that I’m not even sure he understands just how cool of a thing he did.

Aidan has always been fascinated by cemeteries — not really sure why. He just has. Knowing that his Uncle Tim and his Papa O are in a cemetery has no doubt given him a better understanding of the entire death ‘process.’ And, as far as I’m concerned, that’s a good thing.

He came with me to the cemetery on my father’s anniversary. It was freezing cold, so he stayed in the car while I went out and said a quick prayer. I didn’t want to bring him, but he asked some great questions and it was a way for us to connect. So I’m glad I did.

One of the things he asked was who else I knew in the cemetery. I told him I knew a lot of people. He pressed for more information. I told him that the next time we were over at Mimi’s house and it was warm enough, that I’d take him back up and walk through with him and point out the families that I did know.

Sunday, we were over in that area and as we were driving away, he said, “Dad, is it warm enough for the cemetery today?”

Not really wanting to go at that moment, I said, “It’s not that warm, buddy. Why don’t we go another day?”

“But, Dad,” he said, “I want to go now.”

And here’s where he got me.

“I want to meet all the people you know.”

Gulp.

So, to the cemetery we went.

We spent an hour there. He knows my dad and brother’s stones. But I showed him my grandparents’ stone. I showed him the resting spot of a childhood friend who died at age 20. I showed him stones that were ready for the people who haven’t died yet, including my aunt and uncle.

I showed him stones of neighborhood families that I’ve known for more than 30 years.

And then he showed me something. He showed me how much he understands. He showed me how much he gets it. He showed me how much he understands this stuff — even at age five.

How?

Well, even though it was the last day of February, there were still quite a few Christmas baskets out adorning a number of graves. Because of the wind, many had blown over or been blown away from the stones.

Aidan went around the cemetery and fixed more than 50 of these baskets. He made it his mission to make sure each basket was placed properly — and with respect — in front of its respective grave.

I couldn’t believe it as he went from stone to stone, row to row — literally spending 30 minutes fixing these baskets.

I was completely touched watching him do this with such interest and — more importantly — such care and respect.

“Aidan,” I asked, “why do you think people put these baskets here?”

“To remember their friends?”, he asked.

It was good enough for me.

So later in the day when he was running like mad all over the house and pushing his sister around and testing our patience with every word out of his mouth, it was hard to believe that he was the same kid who did something so respectful, so special and so appropriate just a few hours ago.

But, he was. And during that moment in the cemetery, I was, well, incredibly proud.

Making dad proud.

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